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Does the word "Further" fit naturally in the following sentence?

"The modern thinkers believe that by attracting the young generation towards museums, the management furthers the fundamental goal of the museums which is to educate the masses about their history."

Here I want to say that the goal of the museums is to educate the masses, and that the management can get closer to reaching this goal by attracting the young generation.

  • Ngrams shows a number of hits for the phrase... – Cascabel Sep 27 at 14:44
  • You further a cause, typically. Furthering a goal would imply moving a goal farther (further from where it is now). Think alternatives. – Kris Sep 27 at 14:53
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to further OED

  1. transitive. To help forward, assist (usually things; less frequently †persons); to promote, favour (an action or movement). Cf. farther v. †Also to further forth, on.

As in:

1869 J. E. T. Rogers in A. Smith Inq. Wealth Nations: The necessity of furthering a general system of school training.

and your question, modified with this citation in mind:

"The modern thinkers believe that by attracting the young generation towards museums, the management helps forward the fundamental goal of the museums which is to educate the masses about their history."

MY sense is this fits nicely and correctly.

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"Further your goals" is a common saying. Here are some examples of "further your goals" as written on WikiHow and the New York Times:

https://ludwig.guru/s/to+further+your+goals

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