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In editing a book I'm trying to find the word to tell the author that there is such a thing as using too many descriptive phrases or too much description. Anyone? Keep thinking alliteration, but that's not right. Example, He refilled the stumpy thing. He was referring to his scotch glass. Stumpy is unnecessary, and excessive. Which he does often. So, what's the word I'm looking for?

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    There's a such thing as "verbosity." Using too many adjectives is often described as "flowery language." If the words actually add no meaning, then the term is "deadwood." Ironic, though, that you're criticizing this person for having too many words when you yourself don't have enough. – user362274 Sep 26 '19 at 22:09
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There's a such thing as "verbosity."

verbosity

the state or quality of being verbose; superfluity of words; wordiness

Also, using too many adjectives is termed "purple prose" or "flowery language."

purple prose

prose that is too elaborate or ornate.

If the words actually add no meaning, then the term is "deadwood."

deadwood

(in writing) unnecessary words, phrases, or exposition; expendable verbiage.

Ironic, though, that you're criticizing this person for having too many words when you yourself don't have enough. But you're right about using too many adjectives. It makes for terrible writing. So tedious.

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  • There's also 'prolix' – Mitch Sep 27 '19 at 10:50
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and now from the OED: a noun!

TMI n. colloquial (originally in the language of electronic communications) too much information; usually implying disgust or disapproval in response to a disclosure of an excessively personal or graphic nature.

As in:

1996 Lemonade & Pizza in alt.cosuard (Usenet newsgroup) 25 Mar.
All the underwear in question is briefs and not boxers. TMI?

Information overload (1967) was and still is used, but the OED added TMI as a noun in 2009.

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I'd also suggest

Excessive going beyond a normal or acceptable limit in degree or amount

and

Overkill the state or an instance of going beyond what is usual, proper, or needed

but you could also use

Superfluous: 1a : exceeding what is sufficient or necessary : EXTRA b : not needed : UNNECESSARY 2 obsolete : marked by wastefulness : EXTRAVAGANT

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  • I like superfluous – Kris Sep 27 '19 at 2:03
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Informally, purple prose.

Purple prose is characterized by the excessive use of adjectives, adverbs, and metaphors.

Formally, euphuism.

Euphuism is a peculiar mannered style of English prose. It consists of a preciously ornate and sophisticated style, employing a deliberate excess of literary devices such as antitheses, alliterations, repetitions and rhetorical questions.

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