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This is a quote from Franz Schubert's diary, translated from German to English.

Today I composed for money for the first time. Namely, a cantata for the name day of Professor Watteroth, words by Draexler. The fee is two florins. V.C.

What I don't understand is the end of the quote, V.C. I looked up, but no definition seemed to be right when it is used in one's diary.

Does anybody have a clue?

Thank you.

(As a non-native English-speaker, I assumed this is about English language. If not, please let me know and I will delete it, immediately.)

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    This alternative translation of the same text says: A cantata for the name day of Professor Watteroth. The honorarium 100 florins, Viennese currency. Sep 26, 2019 at 11:51
  • I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about an unusual translation from German, not "use of English" as such. Sep 26, 2019 at 11:52
  • @FumbleFingers good find - I was about to go down the 'VG = viele grüße' route. Sep 26, 2019 at 11:53
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    @marcellothearcane: Initially I was really puzzled by that two / 100 florins difference, but now I'm thinking it's a credible OCR error. Sep 26, 2019 at 12:29

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From a comment:

This alternative translation of the same text says: A cantata for the name day of Professor Watteroth. The honorarium 100 florins, Viennese currency. – FumbleFingers

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