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There is a proverb in Urdu, "Bacha bola nahi bola nahi muh khola to Amma maro Bawa maro bola".

This could be translated as, the kid never spoke, but when he did, (to his concerned parents shock) he said, may my father die, may my mother die.

Is there any similar proverb in English?

 

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    What does is mean? What is it trying to say? Is it talking about when you try to help someone, and they turn against you? – marcellothearcane Sep 15 at 7:44
  • Look at "calm before the storm" and tell us whether it is close to what you want. – Scott Sep 15 at 8:26
  • @marcellothearcane Yes, this is what it means. – user357374 Sep 15 at 8:45
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    It means the most eagerly awaited thing eventually turns out to be set against you. Now can someone pitch in with a pithy saying? – Kris Sep 15 at 11:06
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    "In my opinion, the proverb should be the combination of ... and 'don't bite the hand that feeds you' ". But there's no directive/proscription // rebuke implicit in the original. @Kris's interpretation seems most felicitous. – Edwin Ashworth Sep 16 at 11:02
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I think the sentiment is simply

Be careful what you wish for.

(David M changed his mind about this.)

From UsingEnglish.com:

What does 'Be careful what you wish for' mean?

If you get things that you desire, there may be unforeseen and unpleasant consequences.

('Be careful what you wish for, lest it come true.' and 'Be careful what you wish for; you may receive it.' are also used.)

  • Yeah. I had that at first. But in reading the comments, it didn't convey the sense of calm before the storm. – David M Sep 15 at 19:01
  • ...'Cause you just might get it – Lordology Oct 15 at 19:58
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If I understand the meaning correctly, I think the closest I can think of is:

For there to have been betrayal, there must have been trust first.

It's less of a proverb than a quote by Suzanne Collins

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