0

My friend dropped a few historic samurai names A, B and C. And then I mentioned D. He said that D came long after A, B and C. Is it proper to say D is a modern samurai compared to the three? Can I say that D was a more contemporary samurai at the time?

  • Do you mean "a modern Samurai name"? You switch from talking about names of Samurais to talking about Samurais themselves, making it unclear what you're asking. – Benjamin Harman Sep 13 '19 at 19:50
  • Have you looked up modern? Do you mean "modern" or "more modern"? Have you looked up contemporary? Why do you think that word might be useful? – Andrew Leach Sep 13 '19 at 22:15
  • Thank you. By names, I mean historic samurai figures. For example, samurais A, B and C lived in the 10th-15th century while samurai D came much later like around the 18th century. I'm looking for a word that can describe samurai D as being someone who came much later than the three old samurais in the much distant past. Modern gives me a feeling that samurai D is "more advanced" like in terms of living, clothing, or fighting techniques which may be the case but I really just want to use a word that would describe samurai D as a samurai who lived at a time long after samurais A, B, and C. – Kenichi Sep 13 '19 at 22:57
0

From a comment under the question:

Modern gives me a feeling that samurai D is "more advanced" like in terms of living, clothing, or fighting techniques which may be the case but I really just want to use a word that would describe samurai D as a samurai who lived at a time long after samurais A, B, and C.

Contemporary is also wrong, either being synonymous with the modern you don't want, or meaning that D lived at the same time as the others.

Try recent:

[Merriam-Webster]
1 a : having lately come into existence : NEW, FRESH
1 b : of or relating to a time not long past

It could be used in the following way:

D was a more recent samurai than the others.

| improve this answer | |
  • Wow! Yes, that's what I wanted to say.Thank you very much, kind sir. – Kenichi Sep 16 '19 at 8:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.