-2

Is drewn an english word? Can we use it as a past participle of draw?

18
  • 3
    Did you find it when you looked in a dictionary? Commented Aug 31, 2019 at 23:42
  • 1
    Then I think you've answered the question. Commented Aug 31, 2019 at 23:43
  • 2
    Just because it follows common morphological patterns doesn't mean the word was made that way. There are many ways it could've been formed, and it just wasn't formed that way, hence the absence of the word from any dictionaries.
    – A. Kvåle
    Commented Aug 31, 2019 at 23:47
  • 3
    "Drawed" is a moderately common, though erroneous (per most authorities) past tense of "draw". ("Drew" is the correct past tense, and "drawn" is the past participle.) I've never heard/read "drewn".
    – Hot Licks
    Commented Sep 1, 2019 at 0:54
  • 2
    For giggles, I did a search on a corpus called Early English Books Online, to see if this form appeared in early modern English. I received 2 results for drewn. I also received 101,384 results for drawn. Take from that what you will. Commented Sep 1, 2019 at 1:02

1 Answer 1

1

It needs to be understood that words arrived in the English language through about a hundred different paths -- starting from Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, German, Dutch, Scandinavian, Scottish, or Irish, then often ping-ponging back and forth between Old English dialects, and merging and re-merging with said dialects. While one can often discern patterns as to how, eg, verbs are "declined", there are few true "rules" -- some verbs fit the patterns very closely, others not so well. Given the nature of how English developed there is nothing remarkable about this.

Directly addressing the question: "Drawed" is a moderately common, though erroneous (per most authorities) past tense of "draw". ("Drew" is the correct past tense, and "drawn" is the past participle.) I've never heard/read "drewn". If you look in an "authoritative" online dictionary such as Cambridge it will list these.

1
  • 1
    Nice explanation, but make sure you include the basic answer, not just the explanation of the answer. Also, since you wrote an answer, I think you should explain to OP how to find an answer on their own using a dictionary. Walk them through the process of finding possible past participle forms for a given verb. Commented Sep 1, 2019 at 4:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.