0

Is there an adjective to describe "full of failure(s)"? Most often heard it's that s.o./s.t. is a failure, but I'm looking specifically for an adjective.

Edit: I'm looking for a word that encompasses an ongoing pattern of failure, not just a one-time event. Note that while possible, "unsuccessful" doesn't usually imply failure.

She married her childhood sweetheart, built a profitable multi-national corporation, and founded several humanitarian NPOs. What a successful woman!

vs.

She ran out on her family. She was arrested for embezzling millions from her own company; ousted by the board of directors. Then she blew all of her savings on gambling and drugs. What a _____________ woman!

I feel like "failed" and "unsuccessful" don't correctly capture the weight of this context. You could say "failure of", but that's not an adjective.

  • 2
    For single word requests, we need a sample sentence into which the word will fit. See the Tour for details. – Nigel J Aug 22 at 7:51
  • How about "failed"? – Hot Licks Aug 22 at 11:34
  • @NigelJ: Sorry, posted from Android app, and I couldn't find the Tour in there. I'll update. – istrasci Aug 22 at 16:24
  • Perhaps hopeless or worthless. – jxh Aug 22 at 18:18
  • Note that culpability is indicated in your example sentence, whereas 'success' (at least from a worldly point of view) can depend on circumstances, 'chance', and not just (or even not) merit. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 22 at 18:19
2

Updated to reflect question clarification

From your provided example, it seems as if you're trying to connote a moral judgement on the 2nd woman. In this case, degenerate might suit you. From Merriam-Webster:

Having sunk to a condition below that which is normal to a type; especially having sunk to a lower and usually corrupt and vicious state.

She ran out on her family. She was arrested...What a degenerate woman!

If you don't want to necessarily give such a moral judgement, I think hopeless might be more of what you're after (emphasis mine):

Having no expecation of good or success

as in, she ran out on her family. She was arrested...What a hopeless woman!

  • A successful mission and a failed mission. – Nigel J Aug 22 at 13:27
1

Pauperized

pauperize

verb

past tense: pauperized; past participle: pauperized

make very poor; impoverish.

Or,

impoverished

adjective

very poor:

made weaker or worse in quality

  • Thank you for your answer, but see expanded question. – istrasci Aug 22 at 17:28
  • “What a vain woman!” definitely won’t work. “What a futile woman” just sounds odd. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Aug 22 at 17:54
0

Depends on the context. 'Buggy' or 'faulty' work for applications and engineering. For a person, 'hopeless' or 'relentlessly/consistently unsuccessful'.

  • Welcome to EL&U. Please note that this is a Q&A site, not a discussion forum, and answers are expected to explain, not merely state— why do you propose these terms? What are some examples of their usage? What does the dictionary say about them? I strongly encourage you to take the site tour and review the help center for additional guidance. – choster Aug 22 at 12:57
0

You could also use miserable or pathetic, but the first carries a sense of judgement and the second an air if disrespect and maybe even hatred. Depending on context, it may be best to last out the facts that will lead the reader to the conclusion you want them to make. As Brad Pitt told Matt Damon in Ocean's 11, never use seven words when four will do.

0

I searched for antonyms of successful, and the two I think convey the meaning you want are hopeless and unfortunate.

EDIT = I moved my second comment to here.

You could also use miserable or pathetic, but the first carries a sense of judgement and the second an air if disrespect and maybe even hatred. Depending on context, it may be best to last out the facts that will lead the reader to the conclusion you want them to make. As Brad Pitt told Matt Damon in Ocean's 11, never use seven words when four will do.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.