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I would like to know what is the appropriate tense in the following sentence.

An emperor would/will always be an emperor, no matter how badly he botched/botches his job, but a president or a PM will lose his job if he fails to satisfy the majority of the citizenry.

On the one hand, the first part seems to indicate a general rule, thus should use present tense i.e.

An Emperor will always be an emperor...

but on the other hand, I am trying to comment on an institution that no longer exists, and should use past tense.

Thank you for your time

  • You use the past tense because the institution no longer exists. The general rule is not a general rule. It was a general rule. Now it is not even a rule anymore. – RegDwigнt Aug 19 '19 at 12:53
  • Consider King Charles I of England, and King Constantine of Greece, and the Roman Emperor Nero. – Michael Harvey Aug 19 '19 at 13:28
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An emperor will always be an emperor, no matter how badly he botches his job, but a president or a PM will lose his job if he fails to satisfy the majority of the citizenry.

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