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What is the grammatical role of "for you" in "I am waiting for you"? Is it a direct object, a prepositional phrase or what? Functionally, it seems to be of an object, as "you" in "I love you", but I am not sure how English labels objects of verbs which require a preposition.

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The grammatical role of for you in

  1. I am waiting for you.

is that it is an optional argument to the verb. It is not an adjunct. It just happens to be a prepositional argument, not a core argument like subjects and objects are.

It’s also an argument here:

  1. She came looking for you.
  2. I made a cake for you.

If in #2 for you seems more obviously an argument than it does in #3, remember that #3 is just the dative alternation for the ditransitive two-object version:

  1. I made you a cake.
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you is an object in the prepostional phrase "for you"

wait is an intransitive verb so it can not take an object

we can not say I am waiting you

but await is a transitive verb which takes an object

we can say that I am awaiting you

  • 2
    Actually, "waiting" is transitive in a number of contexts. – Hot Licks Aug 17 at 0:48
  • I don't see where you’ve answered the question asked. The question isn't about you. It's about the grammatical role played by for you in the provided sentence. Plus as @HotLicks mentioned, “transitivity happens”: You just wait your turn, you! You either wait this one out or else it’s back to waiting tables again, kid. – tchrist Aug 18 at 3:06
  • @tchrist i answered that it was a prepositional phrase.I do not have as much lingjuistic terminology and knowledge as you have – successive suspension Aug 18 at 3:20
  • @tchrist i answered that it was a prepositional phrase.I do not have as much lingjuistic terminology and knowledge as you have – successive suspension Aug 18 at 3:21

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