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Is there any meaning difference between these two sentences below?

If this story has taught us anything, it's that...

If this story has taught us something, it's that...

If there's not, why is the former preferred over the latter?

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    Can you clarify how the dictionary definitions of the two words don't show what the difference is for you? Also, what gives you the impression that 'the first is preferred over the second? – Mitch Aug 12 at 18:34
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If this story has taught us anything, it's that...

If this story has taught us something, it's that...

The anything refers to one thing of many possible. The something refers to one thing in particular. That is the general meaning and the reason that the first phrase/usage is common and the second is less so. Both are grammatical.

The usage tells the story of a lesson that is gained from the story or experience. It could be that if we learned just one thing, or only one thing it is the following. It is generally about to tell us about that thing whether it is one of many or a specific thing. It makes a special emphasis for the lesson that follows.

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