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According to Cambridge dictionary, the word "pretension" means "the appearance of being more important or more serious than there is reason for", and it gives the following example:

"Leonard’s paintings have a real freedom from pretension."

Does the example mean that Leonard’s paintings don't really have a real freedom? Or that his paintings are not that important or serious?

And Collins has: "if you say that someone has pretension, you disapprove of them because they claim or pretend that they are more important than they really are." And the example given is "Her wide-eyed innocence soon exposes the pretensions of the art world".

Does the example here mean she realizes the art world is not that important?

Thank you.

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    The issue isn't with the word pretension. It's with freedom from, which carries the meaning of 'not'. The assertion is that the painting isn't pretentious. The quote, though, might be. – Lawrence Aug 7 at 16:27
  • I’d try to use pretense rather than pretension. – Xanne Aug 8 at 8:43
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You have nicely provided definitions of pretension.

*Does the example mean Leonard’s paintings don't really have a real freedom? Or that his paintings are not that important or serious? Does the example here mean she realizes the art world is not that important?

America's Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr. google book

"That's what we need: art without pretension, less stuff in the elitist galleries where it is appreciated by few, more that is portable, bringing joy to everyone." Much of ... In a variation on his definition of existence, "Now I owe, therefore I am!

Leonard's paintings have more more freedom - they are free of the pretension of being secluded with the long-nosed elite. His paintings are important and serious. Collin's realizes the art world is very important, and important that art reaches the masses, and is not confined to the sanctimonious, humbugged elitist galleries.

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