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Sentence:

It is amazing that his first product does not look at all rudimentary.

Question:

I am confused about the use of "look at all rudimentary" here. Is it a special use of "look at"?

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    It's not "look at" + "all extraordinary", it's "look" + "at all extraordinary" ... "at all" meaning "in any way" or "in any degree" or "to any extent". It does not look extraordinary in any degree. – StoneyB Aug 6 at 1:48
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The phrase is being parsed incorrectly.

It's not an example of look at, but is as follows:

It is amazing that his first product does not look at all rudimentary.

Here, at all is an adverb, modifying the adjective rudimentary:

[Merriam-Webster]
: in any way or respect : to the least extent or degree : under any circumstances
// doesn't smoke at all

In other words, the sentence could be rephrased in the following way:

It is amazing that his first product does not look in any way rudimentary.

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