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When searching borne online, its meaning says past of bear. When reading a paper, it states: "These findings should be borne in mind by designers". Contextually it sounds like designers should keep it in mind, but is there a different meaning or emphasis that this phrasing creates?

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    Not really. As a BrE speaker, keep in mind that... sounds odd to me when something is being mentioned for the first time, whereas bear in mind that... is fine - but I can't think of any good reason for this and I have only noticed it because AmE speakers use keep in mind that... that way all the time.
    – user339660
    Aug 3, 2019 at 6:14
  • There's a subliminal difference between subjunctive as a mode of future, and imperative as a mode of presence. I guess that's the difference, @Minty? Otherwise be reminded that "to keep animals" means basically "to hold".
    – vectory
    Aug 3, 2019 at 8:00

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The past participle implies that the action, a learning process, should be completed, which implies that the idea shall become innert knowledge, whereas bear in mind rather sounds like the burden of permanently avoiding to forget the idea.

The difference is minicule, if the later is the path to the former. As far as I understand, it simply means "know that ..." or even "appreciate" (in the sense that value appreciates, "may grow and improve"; Cp *Ger Bürde; Würde "honour, responsibility; dignity").

The difference to keep in mind is regional, as @minty points out in the comments.

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    PS: I had speculated elsewhere that keep "to look for, guard" had come under the influence of a reflex of PIE *kept "to take", whence to capture, to have, but I could not say when or where and the idea was rejected by the community (over at Ger.SE about aufheben "to keep, store; to pick up", but also quite counterintuitively "to abolish, deprecate, to lift [a ban]" etc, which had borne the question).
    – vectory
    Aug 3, 2019 at 8:30
  • Also compare, or rather, do not confuse: to bear [a child] "to carry, produce" (cp. birth); bear "naked" (from to obviate, show?), and perhaps Ger verbergen "to hide" (as to keep hidden).
    – vectory
    Aug 3, 2019 at 8:35
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    it is the past vs present that was what seemed unique to me, the keep vs bear was just my own rephrasing for explanation Aug 3, 2019 at 10:11

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