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I’m needing a descriptive word that describes both not recent” and “not old” - essentially the latter.

However, I am not wanting to describe a living thing such a person or animal, but rather, academician.

I understand the complexity of this ask, given if there was a word, a quick google search would show a list. However, I’m also optimistic that given the broadness of the English language, a word meaning such would have to exist.

I would be absolutely over the moon if there is a word, but doesn’t use the words I’ve mentioned above, so long as the point comes across.

The syntax I’m currently needing to word for is: “______[ Research highlights the important details of neurological disorders associated with transcriptional-translational feedback loops in RNA”.

Thank you all very much for your time in helping.

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    Well as I said in response to the other question, it's not one word, but how about "relatively recent"? – nnnnnn Aug 2 at 9:41
  • An academician is a member of an academy. Do you mean academic? – Smock Aug 2 at 12:08
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    @Smock Academician is synonymous with academic. Although both have senses that involve living people (I am an academic or I am an academician)—so using either word to express something that isn't a living person is strange to me. At least without context. (And you're right that academician is only a noun. Only academic is a possible adjective.) Perhaps the question would be better served by saying something scholarly. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Aug 2 at 12:14
  • @JasonBassford I meant academic not as a person but as a synonym of theoretical. (See B2 dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/academic), but yes I suppose that would introduce ambiguity and could still be read as a person. (Academician always refers to a person, but Academic could be an adjective too). I wonder if Research as they use in their example would be a tighter fit. (I'm still not sure what the answer to the question is though!) – Smock Aug 2 at 12:34
  • How is this question not a duplicate of "An English Descriptive Word for Two Words"? – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Aug 2 at 12:36
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I suggest established about which Lexico says

established
ADJECTIVE

1 Having existed or done something for a long time and therefore recognized and generally accepted.

The idea of established implies something that it is not new, but still relevant, and widely accepted as valid.

Established research highlights the important details of neurological disorders associated with transcriptional-translational feedback loops in RNA.

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