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Whatever our view on subject X is, it is clear that X has nothing to do with our question.

I have seen in similar structures that they omit the verbs such as "is" in the above sentence. Can it be omitted? Should it be omitted? What is the most idiomatic way?

  • It might be worth adding one or two concrete substitutions for X as the voicing of "X is" (i.e. "ex is") is slightly awkward. "is" can (and often is) omitted, and in some cases may "sound better" omitted, but I don't know whether there are "rules" governing when it can, of it it should, be omitted. – TripeHound Aug 1 at 13:04
  • The variant including 'is' is not ungrammatical, but does lend itself in this example to a garden-pathiness where 'it' is not immediately perceived as non-referential. I'd use in all but the most formal writing << Whatever our view on subject X, it's clear that X has nothing to do with our question. >> – Edwin Ashworth Aug 1 at 13:28

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