0

Example: Do you have lava flavored Ice Cream? I was recently on a trip to Hawaii and they had the most amazing lava flavored Ice Cream and I thought I just had to check to see if you had some.

The example does not allow the question to be answered. It also has potential to cut off the person trying to answer. It's something that has bugged me during conversation and I have yet to figure out what it is called.

If asked with context before the questions we would call this "preface", yes?

I was recently on a trip to Hawaii and they had the most amazing lava flavored Ice Cream and I thought I just had to check to see if you had some. Do you have lava flavored Ice Cream?

  • I don't follow. The question can be answered—its answer is simply delayed until after the sentences that follow it. Conversationally, it's really no different than saying, "Do you have the kind of lava-flavoured ice cream I had when I was on a recent trip to Hawaii that I thought was amazing, and which I thought I'd check with you to see if you have?" The only difference is in where the intonation is placed. – Jason Bassford Aug 1 at 4:05
  • And if you give context to a question (especially after the fact) you clarify it. But it's not clear if that's what you're asking. – Jason Bassford Aug 1 at 4:11
  • I call it "not giving me a chance to get a word in edgewise" or "not allowing me to answer the question." – aparente001 Aug 1 at 4:38
0

Is there a term for giving context to a question directly following the question?

To qualify the below answer.. I have presumed that, this question is not related to anything written in a book, where Antonyms for Preface can be found.

preface; noun: something that comes before and introduces a more important thingCambridge English Dictionary

Preface in this context normally would only be used in a formal manner.

I should like to preface my response with the following observation.

I am not sure if Lava ice cream readily fits into the description of formal use or that the sellers inventory of exotic ice creams is a more important subject however lets presume it does and move on to the point of your question.

As for placing the introduction (preface) after the question. Obviously what you are now doing is explaining something. So I would suggest there is no Antonym suitable in this case because it is already covered by the word explanation Cambridge English Dictionary.

explanation; noun: the details or reasons that someone gives to make something clear or easy to understand:

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.