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Source: Cambridge Dictionary

learned

adjective fml US ​ /ˈlɜr·nɪd/

having or showing much knowledge:

a learned scholar

I was checking the word learned and the example sentence made me wonder if there is unlearned scholar/professor?

In addition to that, there are three pronunciations of the word learned. /lɜːnd/ /lɜːnt/ /ˈlɜː.nɪd/

I have always heard /lɜːnd/. When I use software to read the paragraph, interestingly it pronounces learned differently depends on the sentence structure. How do I know when to pronounce as /lɜːnd/ and when to pronounce as /ˈlɜː.nɪd/?

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    Isn't the pronunciation ending in "t" for the word "learnt" rather than "learned"? – nnnnnn Jul 30 at 6:49
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    If the context is the same as where learnt would also apply (past tense of learn; acquired by study or experience) use the one-syllable pronunciation, and in other cases (having knowledge, scholarly, well-informed) use the two-syllable pronunciation. – nnnnnn Jul 30 at 6:54
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    The pronunciation was discussed in a previous question where it seems that the third way is a British usage when the context of "a learned scholar" is similar to "a wise man". In other words when "learned" is an adjective, for example "my learned friend." – Weather Vane Jul 30 at 8:16
  • I was checking the word learned and the example sentence made me wonder if there is unlearned scholar/professor? I am sure there are many who consider some professors as such. However by default I would suggest that word cannot exist unless qualifications are handed out without the students having been educated. – Brad Jul 30 at 9:58
  • "unlearned scholar" seems to be an oxymoron, I don't think it's a thing. – Barmar Aug 5 at 19:45

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