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I've recently come across the existence of the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard created by professor August Dvorak. And I've been looking for solid sources on how to pronounce the man's name and I can't find any.

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    Wikipedia contains both a phonetic guide and a recording of the name being spoken. Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 15:48
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    In English phonemes, the unitary Czech phoneme /ř/ is split into a cluster /rʒ/, which forms a syllable boundary in English: /'dvor.ʒak/. This is much like what happens to the unit phoneme /ñ/ in Spanish cañon when it's borrowed as English /'kæn.yən/. Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 16:09
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    @John I’ve never heard anyone pronounce it like that. Most people I’ve heard say it like the Wikipedia article suggests, /ˈdvɔːrak/. Personally I’ve always pronounced it as in Czech, /ˈdvor̝aːk/, but I’m pretty sure most people find that terribly pretentious. Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 16:30
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    I'm in the Southern/Southwestern US. I've heard different pronunciations for the composer and the keyboard guy.
    – shoover
    Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 17:31
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    I read an interview in Byte magazine about 1992 with John C Dvorak, the nephew of the "keyboard guy". John is an IT writer often mistakenly supposed to have invented the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (his uncle August did that in 1936). John said "we say 'Divorak' in our family". Commented Jul 25, 2019 at 18:32

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In a comment, Michael Harvey wrote:

I read an interview in Byte magazine about 1992 with John C Dvorak, the nephew of the "keyboard guy". John is an IT writer often mistakenly supposed to have invented the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (his uncle August did that in 1936). John said "we say 'Divorak' in our family".

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I would pronounce it /d(ə)ˈvɔːrʒɑːk, -ʒæk/ or (spelled another way) d(ə)-VOR-zha(h)k.

This is because that is the accepted English pronunciation of the name of the well-known Czech composer Antonín Leopold Dvořák.

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  • That's how the composer's name is pronounced in English, but not how the American keyboard-inventor's name is pronounced.
    – Mitch
    Commented Jul 26, 2019 at 13:03
  • @Mitch - It's how most people would read the name.
    – Hot Licks
    Commented Jul 26, 2019 at 17:33
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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

In English phonemes, the unitary Czech phoneme /ř/ is split into a cluster /rʒ/, which forms a syllable boundary in English: /'dvor.ʒak/. This is much like what happens to the unit phoneme /ñ/ in Spanish cañon when it's borrowed as English /'kæn.yən/.

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