1

I apologize if my question seems trivial for people who study literature and English language in depth.

My question is basically related to the following statements:

  1. The existence of X
  2. The convergence of X to Y

Here, X and Y are nouns. So I would like to ask the following questions:

  1. Assuming I combine statement 1 and statement 2, when I write "The existence of X and the convergence of X to Y" seems to be redundant. So, is this grammatically correct?
  2. Now, if I reduce repeated words to obtain "The existence and the convergence of X to Y", does it automatically mean X satisfies both statement 1 and statement 2 in general English language?

I apologize if my question is out of context or the way I phrase my question to be strange since I come from mathematical background and English is not my native language.

Thank you very much! Any comment is much appreciated!

0

The short answer is only if the existence of Y is also established. When you link two nouns with a conjunction like this, they both apply to what follows.

  • Thank you very much for your explanation – Evan William Chandra Jul 24 at 5:45
  • Yes, but the existence of X to Y doesn't make any sense. Therefore, the existence and the convergence of X to Y doesn't make any sense. So, even if the existence of Y is established, the particular long form you say is fine actually isn't. (It may be syntactically valid, but it's somewhat nonsensical.) – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Jul 24 at 19:44

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