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Please suppose that the following image is a company including all of its staff, supporters, leaders and key members where the bowman and the bow and the arrow are the whole company including all the parts I mentioned and the final goal is hitting the target with the arrow at hand. This arrow as a simile can be comprised of some quite significant members, (e.g. some ambassadors of a diplomatic group which are supposed to go abroad for some vital negotiations with one of the worlds leading manufacturers in a specific industry for the most beneficial contract ever in the history of the company.)

As you see, the arrow is composed of three main parts:

  1. Tip (The most important part in direction.)
  2. Shaft
  3. Fletching

Can we be inspired by this fact and use it as a simile in English for a very key member (the arrow's tip) in an organizational activity who may/may not have the most important position in the company's hierarchy, but acting the lead role in a particular task/department/mission etc.?

I can think of several similar terms in English, but I'm not sure if we can use them in this sense:

a. I'm in the vanguard of company's whole affairs and the second person after the company's owner/ CEO.
b. I'm at the forefront of company's whole affairs and the second person after the company's owner/ CEO.
c. I'm at the foremost position of the company's whole affairs and the second person after the company's owner/ CEO.
d. I'm in the leading edge of the company's whole affairs and the second person after the company's owner/ CEO.
e. I'm in the cutting edge of the company's whole affairs and the second person after the company's owner/ CEO.

If none of them works, then I wonder what idiom/expression or probabely fixed phrase would you say in idiomatic and normal way for this situation.enter image description here

  • 1
    I think "key players" is fairly idiomatic in this sense. – Hot Licks Jul 20 '19 at 12:15
  • Thank you @Hot Licks, but why the other phrases do not work in your mind or are less acceptable? – A-friend Jul 20 '19 at 13:40
  • Why do you think the tip of an arrow is more important than the fletching in setting direction? – nnnnnn Jul 28 '19 at 7:44
  • Because that's usually the first point that hits the spot. – A-friend Jul 29 '19 at 9:20
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You're the point person. Merriam-Webster:

: point man sense 2

which is

2 : one who is in the forefront especially : a principal spokesman or advocate

(example) the point man for the President's economic policy

A point person leads an initiative, a task, or something else. That person tends to field inquiries and make decisions about that area of focus.

In comparison, your examples 4 and 5 (cutting/leading edge) use expressions that would tend to pertain to technology and development. 3 and 2 (foremost/forefront) are positionally appropriate but make it sound like you're in a race with your colleagues and coworkers; the connotation is competitive. 1 (vanguard) is close to what you want (lead from the front), but has a more militaristic connotation (who are you attacking? what are you protecting?). Point person signals a strong operational position and sounds task-oriented.

  • Yes! I do agree. If I'm not mistaken @TaliesinMerlin, I confronted with "foremost" and "forefront" in quite similar cases. For instance, "He held the foremost/forefront position of the tribe / of the company / etc."! They are pretty much interchangeable to me in this sense. – A-friend Jul 20 '19 at 15:19

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