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I decided to write down all the recipes I know to my website in English. However, I realized that I do not know what many common items are called. To make things even more confusing, I do not know if all the foods (or the equipment to prepare them) even exist in English-speaking countries. I have found various translations, but they do not seem to be very exact and it remains unclear what kind of an item I am speaking of.

How should I call these items so that it is clear what I'm talking about?

Item 1: glass or metal, diameter about 24-30cm. Height about 5cm. Used to bake salty or sweet pies (or at least we would call it a pie).

pie-baking item

Item 2: metal, used to bake sweet... cakes? that are dry. Diameter about 25cm.

dry cake thing

Item 3: metal, used to bake sweet cakes that are not dry. Diameter varies, usually between 20 and 30cm. Removable bottom.

cake-baking item

Item 4: usually glass, used to bake a variety of foods (not pies or cakes) in the oven.

glass baking thing

closed as too broad by lbf, AndyT, Edwin Ashworth, Jason Bassford, David Jul 18 at 18:44

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    It looks like you got satisfactory answers this time (possibly because these are somewhat common pieces of cookware.) It might be better to ask on cooking.stackexchange.com when you have less common items. And if you have such nice images, you can probably do a reverse image search on google to get an idea what they are called. – jejorda2 Jul 18 at 13:16
  • You are right. I also tried the reverse image search for some of these, but I only got results in Finnish (even though the language is set to English). Maybe this is because I got the pictures from various Finnish online shops. – Manuel Britt Jul 18 at 13:30
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    Also note that terminology for foods, equipment, techniques, and measurements also varies within the English-language world, e.g. over-easy eggs, grilling vs. broiling, and so forth. See Translating cooking terms between US / UK / AU / CA / NZ at our sister site, Seasoned Advice. – choster Jul 18 at 14:19
  • @choster: I was thinking that OP may very well have asked this question on Seasoned Advice. – Zack Jul 18 at 15:35
  • I think the answers below are American. In UK I would call 1 a pie dish, 3 a cake tin, 4 an oven dish. Don't know what 2 is! – Mynamite Jul 18 at 22:49
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American here. These are the terms I would know them by:

  1. Pie Pan (metal)/pie dish (glass)
  2. Bundt cake pan
  3. Springform pan
  4. Baking dish
  • You beat me to it. All of these are correct. – Andrew Brēza Jul 18 at 13:25
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    #4 might also be called a "casserole dish". – Hellion Jul 18 at 13:53
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    I (British) would call #1 a flan dish, and speak of a cake tin. – Kate Bunting Jul 18 at 17:23
  • @KateBunting Yes, specifically #1 is a flan dish, #2 is a ring mould and #3 is a spring-form cake tin. However #4 could be one of a number of things depending on its function at any given time. I've used mine for cakes, pudfings, lasagne and bread before now but to me its a deep oblong glass dish! – BoldBen Jul 19 at 0:35
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  1. Tart form. A pie plate/dish/pan has a flat bottom and sloping sides. Common sizes are 9 and 10 inches. Your dish has an indentation designed to hold fruit or other filling in the finished baked good. You can't bake a pie in one of these. Believe me, I’ve tried.

This is a Pyrex pie plate:

enter image description here

  1. The closest you'll get to a Guglhupf pan in English is a Bundt pan, but those are often not as tall. There are some gelatin molds (AmE)/jelly moulds (BrE) closer to this shape.

  2. Springform (cake) pan.

  3. Glass bread (or loaf) pan.

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