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Is there any problem with this sentence? If any, how can I make it correct?

"Social Security Institution is in charge of, authorized and responsible for the collection of the Fund premiums, and the Agency for the performance of all other services and transactions within the scope of this article."

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because there are many errors, so this is not a specific question, just a ploy. – Xanne Aug 14 '19 at 21:56
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The sentence is pretty much correct. I think it should start "The Social Security Institution ..."

It is a matter of personal preference if you should include an "Oxford comma" after "authorised". Some style guides insist you should, others not.
There are several threads on ELU about the Oxford comma and a useful little article here.

It might be easier to read if you broke it into two sentences.

"The Social Security Institution is in charge of, authorized, and responsible for the collection of the Fund premiums. It is the Agency for the performance of all other services and transactions within the scope of this article."

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  • In the days when lawyers were paid by the word of the documents that they drafted they had an incentive to include redundant synonyms to pad out the text and their wallets. In this case is there any real distinction between 'in charge of', 'authorized', and 'responsible for'? If there is, then those three things are different in kind to being '...the Agency for the performance of...other services...', and that would demand two sentences, as suggested by @PeterJennings. If there is no real distinction then you could drop two of the three synonyms. – JeremyC Jul 15 '19 at 21:51
  • @JeremyC Agreed. In which case I'd go for "responsible for" as it could be argued that it implies both "authorised" and "in charge of". I split the original sentence in two for easier reading and comprehension, but IMHO it is still better to do so even if you drop 2 of the 3 synonyms. The old adage KISS. – Peter Jennings Jul 15 '19 at 23:25

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