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I'm Japanese student learning English.

In this tweet(https://twitter.com/HoopDistrictDC/status/1149523950587662336), it says "Rui been on the team for like two weeks and he already got us on!"

What does "He got us on" mean?

I thought this was different form of "He got on with us", omitting "with". Like they have been good friends each other.

Is this correct?

  • It’s best to ask the person directly in this case. It could mean that Rui managed to enter the team in a competition, but given the missing “has” after “Rui”, the intended meaning might be something else altogether. – Lawrence Jul 14 at 10:08
  • Thank you for the comment. I'm agree with that "has" is missing. I wish I could ask it to him but... I changed the title to get what is missing after "on". – miruohotspring Jul 14 at 10:27
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    ... and he has already managed to get us on (the team) (too). – Edwin Ashworth Jul 14 at 10:34
  • Omitting has in constructions like this appears [to this Brit] to be colloquial American English. – Andrew Leach Jul 14 at 11:05
  • It is an informal idiom used by the newer generation to mean “hooked us on”; he is talking about the chips. There is more context to the text if you click on the twitter link. The author is talking about how his teammates “got him on these chips” without the “hooked” - “he got me hooked on these chips!”. It means he likes the chips after his fellow teammate introduced them to him. – aesking Jul 14 at 11:09
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Rui Hachimura already got his teammates hooked on Japanese chips 😂

Troy Brown Jr.: "Bro, Rui been on the team for like two weeks and he already got us on!"

Jemerrio Jones: "It's really good tho."*

It is an informal idiom used by the newer generation to show how much they like something - he is talking about the chips.

There is more context to the text if you click on the twitter link. The author is talking about how his teammates “got him on these chips” without the “hooked” - “he got me hooked on these chips!” It means he likes the chips very much after his new friend, Rui who recently joined the team introduced them to him.

(note: “Rui has been on the team for like two weeks and he already got us on!”) and this is reinforced by the later text, saying “It’s really good though”.

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    Thank you! Exactly what I wanted. I'm sorry for asking dumb question... The answer was already been in original tweet. – miruohotspring Jul 14 at 11:23
  • No problem :) By the way, even if “hooked” was included it would have to be reworded [as, “and he already got us hooked on!...” wouldn’t be grammatically correct as there is no object ] so it would have to be parsed as: “and he already got us hooked on it!”. But this is social media, as you can see no one pays particular attention to grammar, as with the case of the missing “has”. – aesking Jul 14 at 11:29
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    I can barely understand missing objects or "has" like this case, but "hook" is a VERB though... I would never get it without this answer. Maybe just because I don't speak English usually... – miruohotspring Jul 14 at 11:40

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