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I spent the day yesterday with some friends in Manhattan. We were in a food commons area of a mall and had just started to eat a pizza when a couple of college age guys stopped at our table and one of them said “Can I have a slice?”

My friend replied “Sure, if you pay for it” and then the guy said “Oh, you’re not from around here” and then he and his friend quickly walked away.

My friends and I are wondering if he actually wanted a slice of pizza or if he was asking for something else. We are all from the Midwest so forgive us if we are out of touch with modern East Coast customs or slang.

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    He realized you weren't from around there because a real New Yorker would have told him to f*** off. – IllusiveBrian Jul 8 at 4:14
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    What gender are you and your friends? (I don't know what it could be, just wondering) Urban dictionary says slice could be an 1/8 oz of marijuana or a hot, sexy girl. – mkennedy Jul 8 at 17:40
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    It appears that this question is not a covert question or slang that is commonly asked by New Yorkers. I think now that the guy asked the question because he just felt like messing with us at that moment, or in other words, he was just acting goofy. – HRIATEXP Jul 9 at 20:53
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    @Tonepoet The OP knows the usual meaning. It’s a colloquial use of “slice” that has him puzzled. – Lawrence Jul 10 at 6:17
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    I'm from New York, and and when someone asks for a slice they mean pizza. Possibly when you spoke they recognized your accent was out-of-town. And as IllusiveBrian said, a real New Yorker would have told them to fuck off – Cascabel Jul 10 at 22:19
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So far you have not indicated your gender, and that may have a bearing on it.

edit: It has just been pointed out to me by Shoover that gender was noted in a self-comment.

I have not been back “home” in over 30 years, but when I lived there I was not aware of any hidden meaning to a “slice”: a slice was a piece of pizza, and given that you were seated at food court eating pizza, I would normally tend to think that was all they had in mind. However, I did do some digging, and found a few references to sex (not just Urban).

The Urban definition is just too disgusting and misogynistic to repeat here, and sounds like some teen-aged boys participating in a gross-out contest. Certainly the braggadocio would indicate an immaturity of thought, as well as an outsized opinion of their questionable sexual prowess.

I found this conversation at Word Reference.com

In the movie "Mean Girls" one of the girls tells the other

A: Oh, you'll get socialized, all right.

B: A little slice like you.

A: What are you talking about?

B: You're a regulation hottie.

Answer from senior member Chris K.: "Yes, it's a slang term for vagina."

And in the online Slang Ditionary definition of slice…

"a piece of". Whether it be a person (sexual), or a thing, such as wisdom...

So…if you were just a few guys hanging out, I would discount any double meaning, but if you were in a group of girls, it could be that they were playing with your head, and hinting at a hookup.

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    upvote on general principle. I really do not think you need to even mention a hidden meaning. They just wanted free pizza and this could have been in any mall in any US city. NY is not some special place in terms of shitty teen behavior. Right? Yes, group of girls would be different. I am puzzled about the high number of votes in favor of the question....that's quite odd. – Lambie Jul 29 at 18:46
  • @Lambie I don't think it is a New York thing...just a teeny thing. – Cascabel Jul 29 at 18:57
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    Yeah, me too, kiddo. :) – Lambie Jul 29 at 18:58
  • OP indicated his gender in a comment three weeks ago. – shoover Jul 29 at 20:24
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    @Cascabel Understandable. It was hidden behind "show N more comments." – shoover Jul 29 at 20:27
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It means:

Can I have a slice of pizza?

The consequences are that a conversation may then begin, so it may be a chat up line. In fact, it is a common chat up line.

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