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To borrow a phrase, every editor who is not too stupid or too full of himself to notice what is going on knows that propagating the myth of "objective journalism" is indefensible. A newspaper or radio program may try to hide or obscure the fact that the people responsible for its content have opinions, convictions, and biases. But it is impossible to function as a journalist without making subjective judgment calls about newsworthiness, relevance and emphasis, or covering issues about which you have an opinion. Pretending otherwise requires willfully misleading the public.

What does To borrow a phrase mean in the above paragraph?

marked as duplicate by Edwin Ashworth, FumbleFingers, Community Jul 8 at 16:34

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  • Hello, Sai. Have you checked in a dictionary? Longman's spells out the answer. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 8 at 15:38
  • I tried searching in google but couldn't find it anywhere. I'm sorry if it violates the norms of this platform. – SAI HARISH REDDY GUNDA Jul 8 at 15:41
  • Possible duplicate of How do you say to someone that you will reuse a sentence you've just heard from them? Where one of the Answers says when you later actually use a borrowed expression, you can introduce it with "to borrow a phrase". – FumbleFingers Jul 8 at 15:50
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    Reasonable research is required to be shown (even if only to help contributors avoid futile duplication). After ELU hits, the Longman's link was the second one in a Google search I carried out for "To borrow a phrase". – Edwin Ashworth Jul 8 at 15:53
  • @FF I don't think that's going to retrievable without reasonable research. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 8 at 15:55
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It is an expression used to say that you are using words spoken or written by someone else:

To borrow a phrase (=use what someone else has said), if you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.

(Longman Dictionary )

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    So, does that mean the author implies " an intelligent author who uses something someone else has said knows that propagating the myth of objective journalism is indefensible"? – SAI HARISH REDDY GUNDA Jul 8 at 15:37

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