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I turned down the university's acceptance in order to find a program whose professors I more closely identify with.

In the above sentence, it is difficult to figure our whether "with" is being used as part of a phrasal verb or a preposition. I know it is not best practice to end a sentence in prepositions, but even if this "with" is not a preposition, it makes the sentence seem strange.

Also, I chose "whose" because it sounds even worse to say:

I turned down the university's acceptance in order to find a program with professors I more closely identify with.

And in this last example it wouldn't sound right to just leave off the last "with."

  • It's a complete myth that you shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition. People who claim that are just repeating it by rote. (And I actually personally prefer the second version of the sentence, although I find nothing wrong with the first either.) – Jason Bassford Jul 5 at 1:08
  • "I know it is not best practice to end a sentence in prepositions" Absolutely not true. Never has been. – curiousdannii Jul 5 at 1:12
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    @curiousdannii - What?? You should never use a preposition to end a sentence with!! – Hot Licks Jul 5 at 1:44
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While it is no longer fashionable to avoid prepositional endings the effort to avoid doing so is a good exercise in editing and word shuffling. If you find a proposition at the end you can throw it on the other side of the item to which it is pointing. In this case the professors.

I turned down the university's acceptance in order to find a program with whose professors I could more closely identify.

Of the prohibition to ending sentences with a preposition Churchill said it was a rule "Up with which I will not put!"

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