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Sentence 1 : The comparison of Muhammed Bedruddîn Mahmûd el-Aynî’s "Şerhu Süneni Ebû Davud" and "Umdet'ül- Kârî" books

Sentence 2 : Comparison of the "Şerhu Süneni Ebû Davud" and "Umdet'ül- Kârî" books of Muhammed Bedruddîn Mahmûd el-Aynî

Sentence 1 comes to me as more appealing and looking better. However, I am not sure which one is better for academic writing

  • Sentence 1 should likely start with "A", as opposed to "The". I think you can drop "books", and just use that. "A comparison of author's /title1/ and /title2/." – jimm101 Jun 26 '19 at 11:39
  • @jimm101 thanks for the answer. If we drop the books, how can the reader know what are they? – MonsterMMORPG Jun 26 '19 at 12:21
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    The formatting will let people know they are titles. That could mean movies, etc., but it seems unlikely someone would be tempted to read a comparison of two works when they're totally unaware of the context to begin with. If you feel it's necessary, you may wish to use "novels" (or whatever is appropriate), since books will sound a bit off to native speakers. – jimm101 Jun 26 '19 at 13:12
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    When you're already using apostrophes to represent non-English phonetics or spelling, using an apostrophized possessive in addition is a risk. My suggestion: Comparison of Şerhu Süneni Ebû Davud and Umdet'ül- Kârî by Muhammed Bedruddîn Mahmûd el-Aynî. The italics are important, to distinguish the works from the author's name, all of which will be unfamiliar to an English-speaking audience, who don't know Turkish from Arabic. – John Lawler Jun 26 '19 at 15:06
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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

When you're already using apostrophes to represent non-English phonetics or spelling, using an apostrophized possessive in addition is a risk. My suggestion: Comparison of Şerhu Süneni Ebû Davud and Umdet'ül- Kârî by Muhammed Bedruddîn Mahmûd el-Aynî. The italics are important, to distinguish the works from the author's name, all of which will be unfamiliar to an English-speaking audience, who don't know Turkish from Arabic.

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