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Firstly I have researched about those words, This answer really help me understand their meanings.

So I believe that those words are singular form of You, you, your and yours respectively.

Furthermore, "Thou" is a subject form while "thee" is the object form. so could someone tell me if I can use them as following.

Who are thou? instead of Who are you?
I have come to see thee. instead of I have come to see you.
What are thy future dreams? instead of What are your future dreams?
I believe this pen is thine. instead of I believe this pen is yours.

Thanks.

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    The important piece of information missing from your question is in what situation do you want to use these expressions? In everyday speech or in the novel you are writing. And by "can use" do you mean are they grammatically correct, or if you will be considered to be speaking "normal modern English" by native speakers? – katatahito Jun 26 '19 at 8:26
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    I ask because the four words you mention are seen as archaic and almost always feel like they are coming from Medieval or Shakespeare times. – katatahito Jun 26 '19 at 8:28
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    @katatahito I do not intent to use them in day to day life, I am just asking if they are grammatically correct. Thank you. – Digvijaysinh Gohil Jun 26 '19 at 8:31
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    Thou requires a specific form of the verb, which always ends in -((e)s)t (e.g., thou art, thou wert, thou canst, thou thinkest, etc.), so the first sentence is not grammatical. The rest are fine. Since they are so archaic, however, you should be aware that it’s frequently not just a matter of substituting one word for another – in order for it to seem natural, you’d have to emulate other grammatical features of older English as well, such as different vocabulary and inversion instead of do-support in questions (“Camest thou yestereve?” instead of “Did you come last night?”). – Janus Bahs Jacquet Jun 26 '19 at 8:39
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    "Thee" and "Thou" are not archaic in Northern England, although "thou" is often corrupted to "tha". I can certainly imagine someone in Yorkshire saying "I'll see thee later" or "What's tha got in t'bag?" "Thy" would be less common, but I doubt that it has died out entirely. However, I can't imagine a typical Yorkshireman who would use "thee" and "thou" being sufficiently delicate as to use the word "thine". I do agree with Janus though, that "art" is the verb required in "Who art thou?" – Phil M Jones Jun 26 '19 at 10:55
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In a comment, Janus Bahs Jacquet wrote:

Thou requires a specific form of the verb, which always ends in -((e)s)t (e.g., thou art, thou wert, thou canst, thou thinkest, etc.), so the first sentence is not grammatical. The rest are fine. Since they are so archaic, however, you should be aware that it’s frequently not just a matter of substituting one word for another – in order for it to seem natural, you’d have to emulate other grammatical features of older English as well, such as different vocabulary and inversion instead of do-support in questions (“Camest thou yestereve?” instead of “Did you come last night?”).

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