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In this text, is it correct to use the word 'has' at the very end of the last sentence?

A true student would give everything he has and owns to his guru. It doesn’t matter what value it holds, but it has to be everything the student has.

  • It's grammatical, but it's not at all clear what it means. There are three It's in the last sentence, and none of them have any clear reference. – John Lawler Jun 25 '19 at 14:54
  • It should ideally be "A true student gives everything he has and owns to his guru." If the independent clause has ...would give..., the dependent clauses should change to ...everything he had and owned, to his Guru. – Ram Pillai Dec 3 '19 at 15:32
  • There can be a weakness in ending a sentence with 'has': ??'He must not buy a gift; he must give something he has.' // 'He must not buy a gift; he must give something he owns.' – Edwin Ashworth Jul 10 at 11:44
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Yes, there's nothing wrong with it. Has here means something like owns or possesses and its direct object is the everything just before it. You can end a sentence with a verb that takes an object before it, even in formal writing, and it often (as in this case) sounds very natural.

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  • Thanks much for your timely reply! I had a brain freeze moment while editing a long story :( – Ashwini Nayak Jun 25 '19 at 13:11
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For example, I envy the freedom this bird has.

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You have asked the wrong question:

Has does not, actually end the sentence. It ends a subordinate clause:

A true student would give everything he has and owns to his guru.

In this, the main clause is A true student would give everything to his guru.

"he has and owns" is a subordinate relative clause = that he has and that he owns, and refers to, and modifies, "everything".

Likewise,

It doesn’t matter what value it holds, but it has to be everything the student has.

"it has to be everything" is the main clause and that the student has. is a relative/subordinate clause.

There is no reason why "has" should not end a subordinate clause.

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