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I read a sentence which was:

He reiterated his plea for a loose (united), confederation with considerable autonomy for the confederating units.

I don't think there should be a comma in between an adjective and the noun that it's qualifying. Am I right?

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, David, JJJ, Chappo, jimm101 Jun 27 at 2:26

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    If I had to stick almost exactly with the wording, I'd use 'He reiterated his plea for a loose (though united) confederation ...'. But I don't see why there is a need or even a justification for 'united' – how can a confederation not be? – Edwin Ashworth Jun 24 at 11:17
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No, there should not be a comma between an adjective and the noun it is modifying.

He reiterated his plea for a loose confederation with considerable autonomy for the confederating units.

The inclusion of information within brackets does not make a difference as the use of parenthesis is to break from the rest of the sentence and then return to it.

You can sometimes use commas for parenthesis instead of brackets, but in this example, it would be confusing as it would look instead like you were trying to use a number of different adjectives and then included an extra comma.

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You are right. There should be no comma after the adjective. You would only use commas when there are multiple adjectives. For example, "The small, unripe banana". Note that commas separate only the adjectives, so there is no comma following the final adjective.

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