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Recently, I've reported back to my customer representative and got stuck when I needed to say that some task will be solved in some ticket.

I usually play around with Language and try to diversify the way I express my ideas trying to put something more exclusive. I don't want to sound too mere.

In this fashion, I try to memorize the phrases and use them in my everyday activities so that I sound more natural, more like a native:

As an alternative to the phrase "in a question", I found some more:

  • within the issue
  • under the problem

Or maybe even better would be to rephrase the whole sentence.

I really hope you could help me with it.

As an example let's take some sentences with the same idea I've just made up:

  • The problem you mentioned yesterday is currently under progress in the ticket
  • The problem you mentioned will be solved in frames of the ticket (this is how I would translate it from my own language (Russian). I suspect it sounds a bit awkward)
  • We will (are going to) cover the issue within the following ticket...

I don't like the last part of each sentence. How would you propose to express it differently so that it sounds more natural?

  • Which phrase are you asking about: "in a question" or "in a ticket"? Your examples don't include the phrase "in a question", so I'm not clear what you are asking. – Mark Beadles Jun 21 at 11:32
  • Also, one doesn't say "I don't want to sound too mere." Mere can be a synonym of simple, but not in that particular way. – Mark Beadles Jun 21 at 11:35
  • > Which phrase are you asking about: "in a question" or "in a ticket"? Both of them. Here I try to use them as synonyms. – Ilya Zlobin Jun 21 at 12:06
  • Ok, thank you. "Question" and "ticket" are not synonyms in this case, so I would not advise using them as interchangeable. – Mark Beadles Jun 21 at 12:12
  • Under is the wrong preposition. In progress, and certainly not under the problem — I don’t know what you mean or I’d correct it for you. And please explain what you mean by a ticket. It seems that you are trying to use business jargon, when you and the people you are communicating with would be served better with plain English. Do you mean the problem is being attended to? – David Jun 21 at 17:49
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Your first and third sample sentences sound natural. The second does not.

  • [OK] The problem you mentioned yesterday is currently under progress in the ticket.

  • [Not OK] The problem you mentioned will be solved in frames of the ticket
    [As you say, this is not natural and might not be understood.]

  • [OK] We will (are going to) cover the issue within the following ticket.
  • I just want to know about other ways of saying this thing. Maybe you know some idiomatic, informal expressions that English speakers usually use in everyday life. – Ilya Zlobin Jun 21 at 12:43
  • I use a trouble-ticketing system every day at work, and I usually just say it like you do: "in the ticket". Depending on the kind of ticket, I might say "in the incident" or "in the request". – Mark Beadles Jun 21 at 12:45

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