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Does "or" change the word order back to normal in case of a question? Is sentence A or B correct?

A)Take me as your addiction ... or can't you become dependent on me?

B)Take me as your addiction ... or you can't become dependent on me?

Thanks

closed as off-topic by aparente001, JJJ, Chappo, Rand al'Thor, Chenmunka Jun 25 at 17:09

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  • In the first one, "can't you" is the word order for a question. Because of ? at the end, I am assuming that is what you mean. – GEdgar Jun 17 at 19:38
  • If you left out 'or' both sentences would be ok. The firs uses the common word order for questioning; the second is a statement which can be made into a question with the right intonation. – S Conroy Jun 24 at 13:08
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Both A and B are correct but they have different meanings.
A) Take me as your addiction ...or are you unable to become dependent on me?
B) Take me as your addiction ... or you will be unable to become dependent on me.
A) Is questioning (can't you) their ability to become dependent.
B) Is not a question, it is a statement (you can't) that you will be unable to become dependent unless you take me as your addiction.

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