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What does the sentence "You missed it by just a hare" mean, in this context:

Think these are rabbits? You missed it by just a hare

If the context is about rabbit. What are the possible meanings of the bold sentence?

closed as off-topic by lbf, Edwin Ashworth, FumbleFingers, rajah9, Michael Harvey Jun 15 at 14:33

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    -1 spelled 'hair' – lbf Jun 15 at 13:23
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    The writer is making a pun on the homonyms "hair" and "hare." I'm imagining that the reader is seeing pictures of animals that look like rabbits, but they missed ("by a hair") that these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. – rajah9 Jun 15 at 13:39
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    rajah9, you should incorporate that in your answer, since it should address the hare/rabbit thing. – Michael Harvey Jun 15 at 14:33
  • Good point, @MichaelHarvey. I have incorporated a pun alert in my answer. – rajah9 Jun 15 at 15:18
  • It's a PUN!!!!! – Hot Licks Jun 15 at 21:24
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Edit: The writer is making a pun on the homophones "hair" and "hare." (I'm imagining that the reader is seeing a picture of animals that look like rabbits. But these apparent rabbits are not actually rabbits. The reader's perception was off "by a hair.")


I think the correct phrase is "by a hair" or "by a whisker."

By a whisker at Cambridge Dictionary means "by a very small amount."

So if you missed by a hair or by a whisker, you missed by a very small amount.

  • Also, homophones. – Lambie Jun 15 at 15:26
  • @Lambie, I have changed my edit. You are correct: "hair" and "hare" are homophones (=words pronounced the same with different meanings). – rajah9 Jun 16 at 12:33

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