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I was watching a video on Youtube and came across the line: " the claps of an audiance will matter to you more than would ever be wise."

I don't really understand the part "would ever be wise", especially "wise". Could someone please rewrite the sentence with the same meaning. Would appreciate a lot, thank you.

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"wise" in this sentence means "advisable", and "ever" is being used to reinforce a negative meaning:

  • It would never be wise to give too much importance to the claps of an audience.

Therefore, the sentence:

  • The claps of an audience will matter to you more than would ever be wise.

means that the person will care too much about the approval of the audience, more than is advisable.

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"The claps of an audience will matter to you more than you should really care about"

"wise" means smart/knowledgeable "A wise man once told me, don't keep all your eggs in one basket" for example.

the "would ever be wise" translates to "wouldn't be smart" if said in the context of your initial quoted sentence.

However "saving money would ever be wise" changes context to "saving money would be smart"

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  • Thanks a lot. But "ever" here is used as emphasis or which purpose of meaning? – Viet Anh Jun 13 '19 at 15:33
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Here is a more simplistic version of the sentence:

X is more than wise.

This can be parsed as:

X is not wise.


If we add the use of would ever:

X is more than would ever be wise.

This can be parsed as:

X would never be wise.


Looking at the actual sentence itself:

The claps of an audience will matter to you more than would ever be wise.

Paraphrasing this slightly, we can parse it as:

The amount you will care about the claps of an audience will never be wise.


As for wise itself, it means having sound judgment or being prudent.

So, here is an even more paraphrased version of the sentence:

→ You will care more about the claps of an audience than is good for you.

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