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My question has to do with the following example:

“And remember to turn off the stove after using it in the mornings, and—”

“Put up all the ingredients,” I finished for my mother with a little bit of a smirk. “I know, Mom; I won’t forget.”

Should the word put be capitalized in the second line? Thanks!

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    This is literature we are considering and a case not envisaged in the rules for quotation marks. So I would say it is up to you. Because the problem is rare and whatever you do will look odd to someone. I myself would replace the dash with three dots and begin the interruption with three dots and a lower case ‘p’. I would argue that this captures the continuity better. But that’s my personal view. There is no rule or evidence base to which I can appeal. – Tuffy Jun 12 at 22:21
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    I would normally agree with what Tuffy is saying; however, this seems to be an interruption, and does not work well with ellipsis, which normally sounds like a pause or trailing off. For me...I would use the m dashes to end and start. The most important would be how you think it should sound in natural conversation. – Cascabel Jun 12 at 22:57
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    This is more of a style issue, and probably POB. You could look over at writing.stackexchange.com – Cascabel Jun 12 at 23:06
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    So, @Cascabel, would you write it like the following? “And remember to turn off the stove after using it in the mornings, and—” [linebreak] “—put up all the ingredients,” I finished for my mother with a little bit of a smirk. “I know, Mom; I won’t forget.” – The Editor Jun 13 at 21:50
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    @Cascabel I'm going to go with that suggestion. Actually, I'm editing, not authoring, a book. It's the second in the series. If you'd like to read the first, it can be found here: link. – The Editor Jun 14 at 18:55

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