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fit (someone) in (to a schedule)

Is this phrase useful for scheduling meetings and appointments. When you're talking to someone with a busy schedule, you may have to ask them to "fit you in". "Fitting you in" means fitting you into their schedule. You can imagine a schedule book with each meeting or appointment taking up a block of time. If the person has enough room to add your appointment between two other appointments, then you say that they could "fit you in".

I guess it's an idiom, but it doesn't seem as though this is the best way to ask for someone to "pencil you in."

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    "To pencil in" and "to fit in" are different: To pencil [someone or something] in = to make a provisional appointment - the idea behind this is that writing that is done with a pencil can be easily erased, and thus the time of the appointment can be easily changed. To fit [someone or something] in, implies a request or offer that is between two other appointments, etc. This use is a figurative use of "to fit" = to place something accurately and/or within the space/volume between other objects: e.g. "Do these shoes fit your foot?" or. "You can fit that piece of the jigsaw in here."
    – Greybeard
    Jun 30, 2020 at 10:02
  • "I'll see if I can fit you into my schedule" sounds more impersonal, dismissive, than "I'll see if I can fit you in". "Have you any free time tomorrow?" or "Have you a gap in your diary tomorrow?" are perhaps better hedged requests. Jun 30, 2020 at 11:27

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The phrase is ok to use.

You could use:

I can schedule you for (Date/Time) or

We can schedule a meeting for (Date/Time)

to be more formal.

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    On what authority is your answer based? Please read the Help on answering questions.
    – David
    Jun 25, 2021 at 19:26
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A more idiomatic way (and more appropriate/self-evident in case of a busy schedule) is to use squeeze instead of fit.

Can you squeeze me into your schedule?

TFD(idioms):

squeeze into
v.
1. To manage to make room or time for someone or something in some tight space or schedule by or as if by exerting pressure:
The dentist can squeeze you into her schedule next week.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

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  • Isn't 'squeeze into' more informal?
    – Ram Pillai
    Mar 2, 2020 at 9:40
  • Why do you think “squeeze” is better than “fit”. The latter is plain English. Why would you suggest a more idiomatic way of speaking? Expressing an opinion without justification is not an acceptable way to answer on this list.
    – David
    Jun 25, 2021 at 19:30
  • @David, that's not exactly my opinion; I've backed it up with a dictionary entry including an example usage appropriate to the context. And by the way, I respect your opinion. Jun 26, 2021 at 17:31

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