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What is the idiomatic meaning of turn and talk? For example:

I turn and talk like a man leaving charges before a journey.

  • There isn’t one. Please edit your question to include the context where you have heard/seen this, as well as what research you have done before asking here – what you’ve looked up in which dictionaries, etc. – Janus Bahs Jacquet May 27 at 18:41
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    I think you should parse it as "I turn (around)." and "I talk like a man..." But as has been pointed out, this is poetry. – Cascabel May 27 at 19:20
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It isn't an "idiom"; it's poetry, in "Song of Myself, 43" by Walt Whitman - 1819-1892. Words of poems don't have to have a literal, everyday meaning. The preceding lines and words introduce various ideas to do with rotation, so 'turn' is appropriate.

Looking forth on pavement and land, or outside of pavement and land,

Belonging to the winders of the circuit of circuits.

One of that centripetal and centrifugal gang I turn and talk like a man leaving charges before a journey.

Song of Myself, 43

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