0

Please help me understand the following sentence structure:

More than half the roster, including such popular characters as Black Panther, Scarlett Witch, Star Lord, Spider-Man, and Doctor Strange weren’t merely killed, they were wiped out of existence with the snap of a finger.

In this sentence, I notice there seem to be two predicate verbs, "such popular characters as ...weren't killed" and "they were wiped out of existence...". Is that correct? Or here "such as" is used as an attributive clause?

  • If you’re quoting somebody or something, (1) indicate that you are quoting, with quote characters for short quotes and block quote formatting for long ones, and (2) identify the source of the quote. – Scott Jun 7 at 4:41
  • But think about this.   A clause (except in some edge cases) has a verb (e.g., “This is the coin that I found.”)  What verb do you see in “such … as”? – Scott Jun 7 at 5:43
0

It appears there are two independent clauses. These could grammatically be stand-alone sentences:

  1. More than half the roster, including such popular characters as Black Panther, Scarlett Witch, Star Lord, Spider-Man, and Doctor Strange weren’t merely killed.

  2. They were wiped out of existence with the snap of a finger.

Is a comma appropriate to separate two independent clauses?

Strictly speaking, maybe the author should have used a period, semicolon, colon, or dash instead.
However, these two sentences are so closely related to each other that a comma seems preferable.

attributive clause

"including such popular characters as X, Y, Z" is an attributive clause. This attributive clause doesn't contain the verb phrase "weren’t merely killed". The verb "killed" refers back to the main subject which is "half the roster."

For example: "The whole group, including Fred, went sailing."

Who went sailing?

"The whole group".

The verb "sailing" doesn't directly apply to "including Fred" (or "including such people as Fred"). The part "including Fred" isn't the subject of the verb.

  • It's the not ... merely that knits it all together; it tells you that there is more to come. – John Lawler May 27 at 22:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.