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The original sentence:

Idealists have objected to the practice of camping, as to the package tour, that the traveller abroad thereby denies himself the opportunity of getting to know the people of the country visited.

I think the that-clause is a non-restrictive appositive clause for "the practice of camping." Does it sound right to you?

Or may I comprehend the sentence in the second way as below?

Idealists have objected to the practice of camping, as [they have done] to the package tour, [that -- >since] the traveller abroad thereby denies himself the opportunity of getting to know the people of the country visited.

I do not know how to strikethrough that, but I meant to understand that as a causual conjunctive such as "since" or "for".

  • No: appositives are not clauses, but noun phrases that function as modifiers (or supplements) to head nouns, as in "I went to see the opera Carmen". Btw, it seems a poorly constructed sentence -- it doesn't flow at all. – BillJ May 22 at 7:25
  • I would say not. The that-clause expands on "objected to" not on "the practice of camping". If the second part of the sentence, if it is indeed appositive which I doubt, it is in apposition to "objected to". – BoldBen May 22 at 7:30
  • @BillJ, Bill, do you consider the that-clause is an appositive of "the news"? I heard the news that their team had won. – Charlie May 22 at 7:37
  • No. The content clause does not qualify as an appositive: it is a complement licensed by the noun "news". – BillJ May 22 at 9:51
  • The sentence is awkward and difficult to parse. And even if the practice of camping were an appositive (which it isn't), it certainly wouldn't be nonrestrictive. – Jason Bassford May 22 at 10:32

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