0

Detailed descriptions are used in poetry and prose[fiction or even non-fiction] to paint a vivid, detailed picture in the minds of the readers. Authors achieve this feat using vivid imagery about a person or scenery or the emotional height of a particular situation. What is the word or phrase used to describe this detailed description? I first thought of 'narration', but it didn't seem suitable. Thank You.

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, JJJ, alwayslearning, Chappo, jimm101 May 31 at 17:10

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions on choosing an ideal word or phrase must include information on how it will be used in order to be answered. For help writing a good word or phrase request, see: About single word requests" – alwayslearning, Chappo, jimm101
  • "Please include the research you’ve done, or consider if your question suits our English Language Learners site better. Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic." – Edwin Ashworth, JJJ
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • See also depict. – Xanne May 19 at 5:14
  • The adjective evocative will feel satisfying to include. Evocative description. Evocative imagery. – aparente001 May 22 at 5:43
2

You guessed it - it's called imagery in a professional environment, but conversationally you would just say something along the lines of 'detailed description' or 'vivid detail'.

  • Thank You Annie Levi, Imagery seems the right word as a literary device. But I think there should be some other word too, which describes the flow of words to bring forth an object or emotion in front of the reader. – Lalitha Nagarajan May 19 at 6:01
  • Could it also be 'pathos' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pathos) where viewers/readers are swayed by emotion? – Annie May 19 at 6:04
  • Pathos is the root word for 'pathetic'. So the word, though by general meaning emotion generator, in usage it marks only pity and sorrow. – Lalitha Nagarajan May 19 at 7:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.