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i am learning English. and i have a problem which how to use exactly meaning "to" in English ?

closed as off-topic by Laurel, Hot Licks, DJClayworth, Jason Bassford, Chappo May 19 at 4:31

  • This question does not appear to be about English language and usage within the scope defined in the help center.
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  • belongs on ell.stackexchange.com -- Q&A for speakers of other languages learning English – Hot Licks May 19 at 1:20
  • What is your native language? Most languages have a preposition with nearly identical meaning. – Hot Licks May 19 at 1:21
  • sorry my native language have a little of different with English. – user11521227 May 19 at 3:53
  • This is far too complicated a topic to be discussed here. – Hot Licks May 19 at 12:05
  • i think it isn't so far. this is a global website. it isn't only for native speaker which it is for all of everyone want to learn english. preposition in english really diffult with us. so i think this topic is very helpful – user11521227 May 21 at 14:25
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In English 'to', can mean when somebody is going in a specific direction such as, I go to school however, it can also express the change in emotions such as, Gary went from sadness to joy.

  • But, also, as the OP said, he doesn't know how to use "to". In that case it is an "infinitive marker". – Hot Licks May 19 at 1:27
  • Ah okay, my mistake. – Intel May 19 at 1:29
  • for one of extension from this section. i can use "to" if it have to describe a activating person. anythings describe directly ? – user11521227 May 19 at 3:56
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Mostly "to" is used in between two verbs, example, I like to play. And verb direction, like I am going to school, but not I'm going to home, correct is I'm going home.

  • why didn't "going to home" use which "going to school" used ? – user11521227 May 19 at 3:48
  • And there's a grounder between first and second and Parker is going to home! – Hot Licks May 19 at 12:04

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