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So I'm doing readworks questions in class I have have to give a character trait but I don't know what you call someone that is always wrong.....

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    I'm not sure if there is a word. Can anyone always be wrong in everything? Or are you looking more for a kind of nickname, e.g. Mr Wrong or as an adjective: the ever-erring Mr X. – S Conroy May 17 '19 at 13:53
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    Can you give a sentence with a blank to show how you think you want this word to be used? – Mitch May 17 '19 at 14:22
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    Ask my teen-age daughter: she will say it's me... – Cascabel May 17 '19 at 16:21
  • What Mitch said, plus, look in a thesaurus and tell us where your search for the right word broke down. // Do you mean like when someone carries a cloud above his head in a comic strip, everywhere he goes? – aparente001 May 22 '19 at 20:32
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If such a person is reliably always wrong, you may call them a contra-indicator. This is sometimes used in financial markets. You may not know what to do, but then you look at what the contra-indicator does, and you do the opposite for virtually guaranteed success.

Examples:

https://realmoney.thestreet.com/articles/06/10/2016/cramer-ultimate-oil-contra-indicator-has-spoken

https://www.guggenheiminvestments.com/perspectives/global-cio-outlook/davos-as-contra-indicator

https://finance-market-news.com/tag/goldman-contraindicator/

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I'm not sure there is anything that describes someone who is ALWAYS wrong.

But someone who has a tendency always to be wrong, or show bad judgment, is sometimes described as wrong-headed.

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There is no word for someone who is always wrong but im sure we can come up with few suggestions here is my suggestion

  1. Naive - adjective (of a person or action) showing a lack of experience, wisdom, or judgement
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Unsound (adj.) feels like it might work.

  1. Not dependably strong or solid.

  2. Not physically or mentally healthy.

  3. Not true or logically valid; fallacious: an unsound conclusion.

Depending on the context, I'd feel confident in the wrongness of someone described as unsound.

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