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I have this sentence:
"It was to gratify so gallant a veteran with marks of distinction."
If I change it to "It was to gratify a gallant veteran with marks of distinction". So does the meaning of this sentence change?
Please explain it. Thank you

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  • Have you looked up "so" in a dictionary? // "so gallant" is approximately the same as "such a gallant." – aparente001 May 16 at 4:36
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"a gallant veteran" means "a veteran who is gallant". It implies that there are gallant veterans and not gallant veterans, and this one is one of the gallant ones.

"so gallant a veteran" means "a veteran who has reached this level of gallantry". It implies that veterans are on a continuum of gallantry, and this veteran is particularly gallant.

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