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Google defines pithy as "(of language or style) terse and vigorously expressive."

However from the meaning of pith with respect to fruits, the word doesn't seem to contain the attribute of being terse. i.e. when describing a sentence or exposition as pithy I would be figuratively saying it contains a lot of pith/meat.

So I'm wondering if being terse or succinct is a connotation of pithy, or is it not necessary. Can a long sentence or exposition that has substance be called pithy?

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  • Maybe you should also wonder does terse need to mean short? – Jim May 16 at 2:57
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    Many words, including pithy, have more than one meaning. Context determines which of their meanings are relevant. – Jason Bassford May 16 at 4:26
  • Try me. Write a sentence that you think is pithy but long, and I'll tell you if I still find it pithy. – aparente001 May 16 at 4:40
  • @JasonBassford I know, but for pithy, it seems to me that the meaning with respect to sentences/exposition is a figurative use of the word pithy, which with respect to fruits would just mean that it has a lot of pith. – liyuan May 16 at 7:17
  • A lot of pith for the size of the fruit / a lot of meaning for the number of words. – Minty May 16 at 11:13
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Both 'Pithy' and 'Terse' are synonyms. 'Terse' means to use few words, while 'Pithy' means to use few words expressively.

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