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The basement was overflowed by the redolent aroma caused by various flowers growing out the ground.

The basement was overflowed by the redolent aroma caused by various flowers growing out 'of' the ground.

In the above sentence, I removed 'of' because the sentence looked complete without it. One of my friends said that it is grammatically wrong and 'of' should be added here.

Here's another example-

Screamed the man in pain as blood spurted out his mouth.

Screamed the man in pain as blood spurted out 'of' his mouth.

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    Screamed the man in pain as blood spurt out his mouth has several other problems with the grammar (most seriously, the tense of the verbs). – Peter Shor May 15 at 13:34
  • Use of of is a minor problem. The entire construction is ungrammatical; overflow does not work that way. As for the second one, what's the point? – John Lawler May 15 at 14:48
  • “Basement was overflowed”? I’d attend to that first. – David May 15 at 18:56
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Omitting the word "of" in those sentences is a form of slang. It is commonly used, especially in some regions, but it is not proper for formal writing. You can use it if you're writing informally or intentionally using dialect/slang.

I found examples similar to yours in Google Books. The first is from the book Poles 'N' Goals and Hesselink:

Coming out the ground on that balmy night I tried to contemplate what had happened to Celtic, we were top at the end of October, now we had finished so far behind in the league that we didn't even qualify for Europe through it.

And this is from the book At Bully Hills:

Flowing sprays of blood spurted out his hollow neck. The Beast was still alive, his head lay in the sand, black eyes blinking; his mouth gasped for breath. A blood red foul froth foamed at his fangs..

Notice how both sentences come from novels that use a relaxed style. Clarity is the big reason to make sure you're using "of" when describing the relationship between two things. For example, consider the following quote from the Bible.

Take these things out of here! Don’t make my Father’s house a marketplace!

In that sentence, Jesus is saying "dispose of these things, get rid of them." If you change the sentence...

Take these things out here! Don’t make my Father’s house a marketplace!

...he might be understood to be asking that "these things" be brought to where he is, which is a very different meaning.

EDIT: Check out Peter's comment for important context. I was about to adapt the comment into my answer before realizing that I can't improve on how Peter said it.

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    This answer completely ignores the difference between American English out and out of: without of, out means out through. So I walked out of the door and smoke comes out the chimney are both fine. But he ran out the house is wrong. And out his hollow neck is okay in the U.S., but coming out the ground on that balmy night is wrong. – Peter Shor May 15 at 13:32
  • @PeterShor you're right. I just edited my answer to encourage people to read your comment. I used the "spurted" example because the writing style is clipped and informal, which is probably not what OP wants in his writing. – Andrew Brēza May 15 at 13:42
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    Can you be more specific as to what varieties where dropping the 'of' occurs? It doesn't sound at all like slang or a regionalism or even a foreignism to me. It sounds like a typo, that is, it is totally wrong to me, I've never heard it before. – Mitch May 15 at 14:18
  • @Mitch I commonly hear it from my Southern friends. I don't have a scholarly citation. – Andrew Brēza May 15 at 14:57
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    @Mitch: Nobody I know says "coming out the ground." I think it's totally wrong. I just deleted my comment because I misunderstood the comment of yours I was replying to. – Peter Shor May 15 at 18:14

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