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I'd like to have a couple of examples of words which have two meanings regarding articles, definite and indefinite. Ex. President; a: political/ the: business

closed as unclear what you're asking by Mari-Lou A, Chappo, Jason Bassford, JJJ, Cascabel May 14 at 11:43

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    Voting to close for being unclear. How can a/the president have two different meanings? The President of the USA (political), The President of Apple (business) and "a president of a company once said..." vs. "a famous US president once said..." – Mari-Lou A May 13 at 9:19
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There is no difference between the Indefinite and Definite articles in relation to the changing of meaning of the modified noun, that is, the noun does not change its meaning by using the Definite or Indefinite articles.

I live in a house -> house is the place I live in, its just not a specific house.

I live in the house -> house is the place which I know that you know we are talking about.

The noun's meaning stays the same.

However,

the Zero article (a noun with no apparent article attached to it) does change the meaning of the noun it modifies.

e.g.

You have egg on your shirt -> egg being the uncountable substance that an egg dropping the shell is made of.

You have an egg in your hand -> egg being that whole thing that a chicken drops. (a chicken fetus if you like :) )

Look! I have a hair in my soup -> a single hair of someone's head is in my soup.

Look! She has beautiful hair -> that girl's head is adorned with a beautiful set of hair.

The Zero article is able to turn a countable noun into an uncountable noun,and vise versa, and in that, change that noun's meaning.

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I'm not sure I understand what you're asking, but I'll give it a try.

I used to live in a white house. I thought it would be hard to keep clean, but actually it wasn't a problem.

This just means I lived in a house, the color of which was white.

The president of the US lives in the White House.

Here, there's a specific building that has become known as the White House, and that is where the president lives.

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