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As far as I know, the rule goes that 's is used to make possessive forms of abbreviations. But I've noticed some inconsistencies:

... as it was announced that the Uefa's Executive Committee had overwhelmingly voted to award...

...a member of the UEFA's HatTrick Committee.

vs:

Women to be represented on the UEFA board for the first time.

The UEFA board decided to introduce a new...

The decision was made by the UEFA executive committee at a meeting in Nyon.

The Uefa Executive Committee decided to amend...

All the above come from .uk sites, the last one from thetimes.co.uk. Can anybody provide some explanation, please?

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    It can be either. One is an attributive noun and the other is a possessive. – Jason Bassford May 11 at 12:21
  • Thanks. Would you say it's necessary to be consistent in my paper if I'm going to write about a dozen or so different organizations, or can apply either of the ways whenever I want e.g. ABC's Promotion Department but DEF Executive Board? – shogun May 11 at 12:50
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If UEFA is pronounced (or possibly even only thought of) as an initialism, standing for Union of European Football Associations, then the definite article is required. In this case, the article relates to the noun immediately following, that is, UEFA not committee:

A member of the Union of European Football Associations' executive committee...
A member of the U.E.F.A.'s executive committee...

A member of the UN's Security Council...
An example of an NGO's operations is...

If UEFA is pronounced as a single word /ju:ˈeɪfə/, it's treated as a name. Names don't get the definite article.

A member of UEFA's executive committee...

A member of London's police force...

If it's not a possessive, then UEFA becomes an attributive noun, which functions as an adjective. The article is then governed by the head noun, committee.

A member of the UEFA executive committee...
A member of a UEFA committee...

A member of the UN Security Council...
An example of NGO operations is...

  • And yes, where the house style has resulted in Uefa, that should be treated as a name. Giving it an article is confusing at best and wrong at worst. – Andrew Leach May 11 at 13:34
  • In writing then, I don't see much difference between A member of the U.E.F.A.'s executive committee... and A member of the UEFA executive committee.... It's just a matter of punctuation and consistency, isn't it? – shogun May 11 at 13:40
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    Yes, except that UEFA is universally pronounced as a name, so to spell it out as "U.E.F.A." would certainly be odd. UN is universally pronounced as an initialism, so that can certainly be either (and consistency is good, although not necessarily required). – Andrew Leach May 11 at 13:44
  • Thanks. U.E.F.A. looks odd indeed. – shogun May 11 at 13:48

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