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I want to know if it's grammatically correct to make a comparative sentence with the word "Better" like this: "I'm better a student than you" instead of this: "I'm the better student than you are"

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    Neither of these are grammatically correct. You could say "I'm a better student than you", "I'm a better student than you are" or "I'm the better student". – Tim Foster May 9 at 17:50
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    @TimFoster hmm, I think it's borderline correct, so I checked and found this snippet: You are better a man than he will ever be, more handsome, more firm and you have the wisdom of the Gods. – Mari-Lou A May 9 at 17:53
  • @Mari-LouA Oh interesting, never seen that before, except after "no". Still, I dare say this is pretty much limited to literary usage in modern English. – Tim Foster May 9 at 18:01
  • @Mari-LouA - Yes, "I'm better a student than you'll ever be" works, but I don't think "I'm better a student than you" works. // Kien, you can fix the second sentence like this: "I'm the better student than you." – aparente001 May 10 at 5:27
  • @aparente001 I'm the better student than you ? Really? For me it's of the two of us, I'm the better student or I'm a better student than you. – Minty May 10 at 14:15

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