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I am reading through the blue grammar book and the following is the definition of prepositions-

A preposition is a word or set of words that indicates location (in, near, beside, on top of) or some other relationship between a noun or pronoun and other parts of the sentence (about, after, besides, instead of, in accordance with). A preposition isn't a preposition unless it goes with a related noun or pronoun, called the object of the preposition.

If we consider the sentence- "he is honest", 'is' shows the relationship between 'he' and 'honest', it tells us he has the quality of honesty, I understand why it is considered a verb but do not understand how it is not a preposition as it satisfies the definition above?

Link for the relevant passage- https://www.grammarbook.com/grammar/probPrep.asp

closed as off-topic by Robusto, Chappo, Cascabel, TrevorD, JJJ May 10 at 23:45

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    I'll grant you that is is a very odd verb; perhaps the oddest in English and perhaps no longer a real verb. However, that's not the correct definition of a preposition. The source is simply wrong; find a better one. A preposition is a word that, when stuck before a noun phrase, forms a larger phrase with that can modify many different things in a sentence. Never mind what it means. Grammar is not about meaning but form. Prepositions do not behave like verbs. – John Lawler May 8 at 22:53
  • @JohnLawler could you please recommend a better textbook? – magenn May 8 at 22:57
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    @Cascabel ok thanks :) – magenn May 9 at 0:36
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    For a moment, imagine that a language (like ASL) didn't use "state of being" verbs (be, am, is, are, was, were). "I am from Texas" vs. "I FROM T-X." But you still need the preposition; see the difference? – KannE May 9 at 0:54
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    If you're in CS and you either have or have access to native intuitions, you can probably benefit from McCawley's approach. He has a syntax text and a semantics (logic) text; I recommend both. They'll be in your university library. – John Lawler May 9 at 1:36
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In a comment, John Lawler wrote:

I'll grant you that is is a very odd verb; perhaps the oddest in English and perhaps no longer a real verb. However, that's not the correct definition of a preposition. The source is simply wrong; find a better one. A preposition is a word that, when stuck before a noun phrase, forms a larger phrase with that can modify many different things in a sentence. Never mind what it means. Grammar is not about meaning but form. Prepositions do not behave like verbs.

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