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The fact that the organisation had improved its security, prior to a whistle blower's complaint in 2015 may have worked in it's favour now.

In the above statement, I intend to mean that the organisation improved its security in 2015 after a whistle blower had complained. Should I use a comma(,) after 'prior' in this statement to convey the right meaning?

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    No. Put a comma after "2015", so that "prior to a whistle blower's complaint in 2015" can be interpreted as a parenthetical explanation. – Greg Lee May 7 at 12:45
  • Actually in the article, in the preceeding statement(preceeding to the quoted statement) it was discussed about the current situation of the organisation. So can a comma after prior mean 'improved its security previously, to a whistle blower's complaint in 2015' ?Please explain. – Mohan May 7 at 12:58
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As written, "prior" would mean that it had improved its security before the whistle blower complained. You could say something like

The fact that the organisation had priorly improved its security, after a whistle blower's complaint in 2015, may have worked in its favour now.

Or just cut the priorly altogether;

The fact that the organisation had improved its security after a whistle blower's complaint in 2015 may have worked in its favour now.

Note also that "its" should not take an apostrophe in this case.

  • I found this statement in a reputed newspaper known for its high standard of English(atleast that's what my friends told me about the newspaper). Please tell me whether a comma after 'prior' would work out because I believe its a printing mistake. – Mohan May 7 at 12:49
  • No, it wouldn't work. Looks to me as though someone has written prior to when they mean following. On top of that there's a missing comma and a misplaced apostrophe. Could just be carelessness though. – user339660 May 7 at 17:07

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